The State Department has designated 19 U.S. cities as acceptable for refugee resettlement which made the Biden administration’s resettlement policy clear: pedal to the metal; damn the torpedoes, full-speed ahead. Afghan resettlement deserves maximum caution; the administration took the opposite road. The official argument for speedy resettlement is that our allies — those who purportedly worked side-by-side with the American military — are in grave danger, and must be airlifted out of Kabul immediately. No doubt, there’s some truth in that assessment. But Americans want guarantees that only friends receive invitations.

Since Americans are, by and large, trusting people who…


On July 28, The New York Times published an op-ed titled, “There Is No Good Reason You Should Have to Be a Citizen to Vote.” The Times described Atossa Araxia Abrahamian’s opinion piece as “part of a series [‘Snap Out of It, America’] exploring bold ideas to revitalize and renew the American experiment.”

Bold, revitalize and renew are the misleading words that the Times chose instead of the more accurate: radical, audacious and subversive. The American experiment that the Times boasts proudly of championing is overthrowing America’s existing, time-honored voting system which legally excludes voting rights for noncitizens.

Abrahamian, the…


Kabul, Afghanistan, 2004.

No sooner had the Taliban taken control of Kabul than the establishment demanded that thousands of Afghans be given immediate U.S. resettlement privileges. Allegedly, and likely at least partially accurate, some Afghans are friendly to the U.S. government, and worked with American military. Now, so goes the standard patter, with our allies’ lives reportedly endangered, the Biden administration has a moral duty to invite them to America to find safe haven.

In a bitter irony, the most passionate cry to immediately resettle Afghans came from former President George W. Bush whose fallacious “weapons of mass destruction” claim first drew the…


The federal government’s U.S. Drought Monitor indicates that nearly half the nation is suffering from abnormally dry drought conditions. States in the West are the most adversely affected, but parts of the Midwest and the East are classified as experiencing extreme, severe or moderate drought. The Pacific Northwest has not seen a spring this dry since 1924, and this is the second driest March to June on record for Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

In California and Nevada, reservoirs are low, approaching but not quite matching 2012 to 2016 levels. Continued drying increases wildfire risk throughout the region, reflected in several…


On July 29, Richard D. Lamm, Colorado’s three-term governor, 1975–1987, died of complications from a pulmonary embolism. He was a week away from his 86th birthday. Lamm was a Democrat who earned his J.D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley, served in the U.S. Army and became an attorney for the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Commission. Once his third gubernatorial term ended, Lamm was executive director of the University of Denver’s Center for Public Policy, and wrote several books.

During his 12 years as Colorado’s governor, Lamm spoke out unflinchingly about the issues most important to him — protecting the fragile…


In a move consistent with the Biden administration’s walk back of former President Donald Trump’s tougher immigration actions and guidelines, the Department of Homeland Security announced that it would not pursue time limits on student F-1 visas. Like virtually all of the dozens of visas available to foreign nationals through the federal government, the F-1 visa is wrought with fraud. When President Trump introduced his proposed visa restrictions, he said his administration was acting in American students’ best interests.

To support its claim that tighter oversight is necessary, the Trump administration gave an example of an international student who remained…


Last week, the perpetually offended scored another big win. The venerable Cleveland Indians announced that next year their nickname will be the “Guardians,” a reference to two large landmark stone edifices near Progressive Field. For the woke, the triumph isn’t quite on the scale of tumbling down or defacing statues of America’s founding fathers, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, but the symbolism is identical.

Indians’ management claims that polling found that the Indians name generated deep dissatisfaction among its fan base. Maybe, but skeptics would like to see who was polled, and how the questions were phrased. In all probability…


Border crossers, San Miguel, Ariz.

One of the 21st century’s biggest stories is slowly fading from the headlines.

Effective with President Joe Biden’s inauguration, the U.S. opened its doors to anyone who reaches the Southwest border. The thousands of illegal aliens that teemed over the border since January 20 negate the need for a formal announcement — the proof is on the nightly news as viewers watch hundreds who have illegally entered surrender to Customs and Border Patrol.

In April, near San Miguel, Ariz., 130 migrants turned themselves in to CBP. The alien inflow is such a common, daily occurrence that most media no longer…


Major League Baseball’s All-Star Game (ASG), also known as the mid-summer classic, evolved from an unlikely union between National and American League. Chicago Tribune sports editor Arch Ward came up with his brainstorm in 1933 when the Windy City hosted the Century of Progress Exhibition, later known as the Chicago World’s Fair. Chicago officials asked local sportswriters to submit ideas for a sporting event that would draw out-of-towners to the fair. Ward was convinced that an ASG between the National and American League’s best players, the teams selected by the fans, would be a huge success. …


The United States is apparently on the verge of complete withdrawal from Afghanistan, its longest and costliest foreign war. Nearly 20 years in duration, at a staggering $2.3 trillion cost that mounts daily, the war is an albatross left over from the Bush administration. Brown University’s Costs of War Project calculated that the federal taxpayer has spent about $16,000 per person to keep this futile and seemingly endless conflict raging. The War Project consists of 35 scholars, legal experts, human rights practitioners and physicians who have been studying the Afghan War’s devastation since 2011.

Brown University further estimates that the…

Joe Guzzardi

Syndicated columnist Joe Guzzardi writes about immigration issues and American baseball history.

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