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Once again, the big guys, those with money, power and influence, are ganging up on the little guys, Americans struggling in the neverending pandemic shutdown to earn a sustenance-level income.

As is too frequently the case, immigration, and specifically President Biden’s U.S. Citizenship Act of 2021, is the focal point of the ongoing lopsided battle of the elite versus the working classes. At the February 19 New England Business Immigration Summit (NEBIS), Harvard’s president, Lawrence S. …


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Events on Capitol Hill and the Southwest border are unfolding at dizzying pace. The outcome of those developments will have long-lasting and irreversible effects. At the center of the chaos is immigration, the tumultuous topic that has embroiled Congress since the Immigration Reform and Control Act that President Ronald Reagan signed into law in 1986, 35 years ago.

During the budget resolution debate that will pave the way for a mid-March final vote on President Biden’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill, Republicans filed a staggering 900 amendments. Two Republican Senators proposed blocking stimulus checks from being paid out to unlawfully…


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During February’s first week, alarming news came out of Washington, D.C., and from the Texas-Mexico border. Although the January Bureau of Labor Statistics report and the increased border activity are separated by 1,800 miles, the two events will inevitably be tied to each other.

The BLS report which showed that the economy created a meager 49,000 jobs, well below the 103,000 estimate, was widely publicized. BLS also revised downward the November and December job numbers, and noted that the combined employment for those two months was 159,000 less than previously indicated. Corporations slashed nearly 80,000 employees from their payrolls. …


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Facebook has two pages that are, unsurprisingly, picking up a host of new followers: “Leaving California” and “Life after California.” These pages caught my attention because as a native-born Californian who left the state, and discovered life after California, I’m curious about what Facebook members considered to be the last straw in their decision to relocate. And I’m unable to decide whether leaving California is tougher for disappointed out-of-state transplants or natives who remember California in its former splendor — the unspoiled grandeur that attracted millions of midwestern and eastern seaboard dwellers to the Golden State.

The further back native…


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According to Capitol Hill insiders, President-elect Biden’s first matter of business will be to pass immigration amnesty legislation. Biden promised to, as he described his intentions, “introduce” an immigration bill within his administration’s first 100 days. And without wasting a moment, the president-elect’s advisors met last week with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus chair Rep. Raul Ruiz, and other House amnesty proponents, to develop a strategy to move forward. In December, signaling their party’s intention for the 117th Congress, Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) and Linda Sanchez (D-Calif.) introduced a bill with the short title of the “Seasonal Worker Solidarity Act of 2020.”


The Enemies He Made; the Friends He Kept

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In 1924, Richard L. Simon and M. Lincoln Schuster founded what is today America’s third largest publishing company. Simon & Schuster’s first foray into publishing was crossword puzzles books. Simon’s aunt was a crossword puzzle enthusiast, so the newly formed company wisely decided to fill the nation’s puzzle book void. Nearly a century later, Simon & Schuster made the curious, from a corporate perspective, woke decision to cancel Sen. Josh Hawley’s book, “The Tyranny of Big Tech,” for what the company described as “his role in what became a dangerous threat to our democracy and freedom.” Stated more precisely, Simon…


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As a kid growing up in post-World War II Los Angeles, the Rose Bowl was the year’s single most anticipated event. In sports, the Dodgers were still in Brooklyn; the Lakers in Minneapolis; and the Rams had only recently relocated from Cleveland. The thought that professional ice hockey might one day be played in sunny Southern California was too preposterous to take seriously. In some circles, but not the under-16 age group, the Academy Awards were Los Angeles’ annual highlight. …


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As President Trump weighs which course he may walk as his White House days grow short, he’s considering two paths.

The first is to watch from a distance, and not interfere with the incoming Biden administration. Biden’s early appointees, namely Chief of Staff Ron Klain, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alexander Mayorkas and phony-baloney climate envoy John Kerry are Obama-era retreads. Given that eight years of the Obama administration — which prominently included Klain, Mayorkas and Kerry — helped elect President Trump, the president’s thinking may be that Biden’s agenda will play out favorably for the 2024 GOP candidate. …


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To some Democrats, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi seems invulnerable. This year, two Pelosi events that would shame average Americans, and cost them their jobs, were like water off a duck’s back.

First, Pelosi foolishly and brazenly ripped up President Trump’s State of the Union address, which some asserted broke the Federal Records Act. Second, Pelosi was caught mask-less at a San Francisco hair salon. In-person hairstyling violates San Francisco’s COVID-19 safety policy, a crime. …


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Immigration, the nation’s most contentious domestic issue, finally got airtime in the final debate between President Trump and challenger Joe Biden. The former Vice President went way out on a limb when he promised immediate amnesty to roughly 11 million unlawfully present foreign nationals.

Biden stuck his neck out further when he said that Americans “owe” citizenship to illegal immigrants: “We owe them, we owe them…” Biden’s verb choice will disappoint the moderate and undecided voters he needs in his White House quest who view amnesty as a reward for knowingly breaking U.S. laws.

Amnesty is the federal government’s pardon…

Joe Guzzardi

Joe Guzzardi is an analyst with Progressives for Immigration Reform and a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist.

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